SawStop Contractor Saw Cabinet – Part 2

Last time around, I had finished my torsion box base with low riding sliding drawers.  The next step in the journey was to construct the box upon which the saw itself will sit.  I looked at many options.  Solid wood, plywood, open frame, closed frame.  I needed to integrate dust collection as well, and possibly storage.  In the end I created a design which is a combination of a couple of things.

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The box is constructed entirely of 3/4″ oak plywood.  The bottom is constructed of a rectangle which is put together using Kreg pocket screws.  The top ‘mid-top’ is the same.  They are held up on the sides by solid plywood.  The very top is a solid piece of plywood, with a hole cut out of it to match the swing of the motor and dust collection port on the saw.  This could also have been constructed using the Kreg framing, but I wanted to try this way as well.

That forms the basic box.  It was pretty solid, but I wanted to go one step further.  I put additional plywood sides on with full surface gluing.  This should prevent any rocking forward/back.  Before usage, I will stick a false front on the thing, and that should eliminate any side rocking.  It’s feeling pretty solid though, so I don’t think there will be much.

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Here’s what it looks like with the saw sitting atop the box, atop the rolling base.  I had to strip it down so that I could then slide it off the base and onto the box without the help of others, or a hoist.

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There’s the old steel base, ready to go for its next adventure.

Most of the builds I have seen have the forethought of incorporating a sloping slidey thing for the dust chute, or a drawer, or sliders, and what have you.  I could not think through my dust collection options completely, so I just designed the base as an open box.  That way, I can build any type of drawer, slide, tubing, what have you, and just slide it into the open slot.  If I want to change it later, I can, without having to build a whole new base/box.

I also decided that I don’t need to go for a full integrated unicabinet design.  In fact, it’s better to make this whole thing modular so that I can change it easily over time as my needs change.  For example, most builds have the saw mounted as I’ve shown here.  Then they have large outfeed tables so that they can do long rips.  Well, truth be told, most of what I’m going to be doing on a table saw is probably longish rips, or fairly short stuff where a sled will be utilized.  So, having all this width isn’t really that beneficial.  Easy enough, I can just turn the box sideway, and layout an outfeed table atop the torsion box, and be done.

To that end, the base is simply screwed down to the torsion box.  It’s not glued.  Other boxes will be constructed, and just screwed down as well.  Whether it’s drawers, a router extension, or what have you, just throw it on there, and get to making chips!

Almost done.  Now I need to construct the simple supports so I can reassemble the table.  The easiest thing will be to simply go back to what I had for now, that is, the super long rails, extension wings and table.  I’ll just have to adjust the length of the legs on the support table, and call it a day