What happens when PC cooling fails?

So, a few months back, I finished the ultra-cool tower PC build.  A strong motivator for building that system was to utilize a liquid cooling system, because I had never done so before.  So, how has it gone these months later?

Well, it started with some strange sound coming from the pump on the reservoir.  It was making some clicking sound, and I couldn’t really understand why.  Then I felt the tubing coming out of the top of the CPU, and it was feeling quite warm.  Basically, the liquid cooling system was not cooling the system.

Bummer.

But, I’m a tinkerer, so I figured I’d just take it apart and figure out what was going on.  I took apart all the tubing, and took the CPU cooling block off the CPU as well.  I opened up that block, and what did I see?  A bunch of gunk clogging the very fine fins within the cooling block.  It was this white chalky looking stuff, and it was totally preventing the water from flowing through.  As it turns out, the Thermaltake system that I installed came with some Thermaltake liquid coolant, and that stuff turns out to be total crap.  After reading some reviews, it seems like a common affliction that using this coolant: Thermaltake C1000 red will eventually leave a white residue clogging the very fine parts of your cooling loop, forcing you to flush and refill or worse.

Well, that’s a bummer, and I would have been ok after that discovery.  Problem is, along the way, I put the system back together, turned it on to reflush the system, and walked away for a bit…

Luckily, my Android phone that I used to take the various pictures factory reset itself, so I no longer have the evidence of my hasty failure.   It so happens that when the CPU cooling block was slill clogged, and I put the system together, I didn’t tighten down the tube connecting to the block tight enough.  Enough pressure built up that the tube popped off.  Needless to say, I’ll need to replace the carpet in my home office.  And, I can tell you, the effect of spilling about a half gallon of water on the inerds of your running computer motherboard, power supply, and all the rest, is almost certain death for those components…

Sigh.

So, I started by dryingeverything off as best I could.  I used alcohol and q-tips to dab up obvious stuff.  The motherboard simply would not turn on again.  There are a lot of things that could be wrong, but I thought I’d start with the motherboard.

I ordered a new motherboard.  This time around I got the Gigabyte GA-Z170X-Gaming 7.  This is not the exact same motherboard as the original.  It doesn’t have the option to change the bios without RAM being installed, and it doesn’t have as many power phases, but, for my needs, saving $120 was fine, since I lost the motivation to go all out in this replacement.

The motherboard was same day delivery (which is why Amazon is great).  It installed without a flaw.  Turned it on and… glitchy internal video!  Aagghh.  OK, return this, and in another day get another of the same.  This time… No problems.  Liquid cooling system back together, killer video card installed, monitors hooked up, and it all works as flawlessy as before, if not better.

This time around, I’m not installing any fancy cooling liquid.  I’ve done my homework, and everyone who actually does these systems to run for the long run simply uses distilled water, and perhaps some biocide.  I chose to get one of those sliver spirals to act as the biocide.  That way there’s not chemicals to deal with.

When the silver coil arrives, I’ll have to drain the pipes one more time to install it in the reservoir.  I’ll also take the opportunity to use pipe cleaners on the tubes, which have become a bit milky looking due to the sediment from the C1000 cooling liquid.  I now have a checklist for assembling the cooling system, to ensure I tighten all the right fittings, and hopefully avoid another spillage mishap.

Thankfully the CPU, memory sticks, video card, power supply, and nvme memory were all spared spoilage from the flooding incident.  That would have effectively been a new PC build (darn those CPUs are expensive).

Lesson learned.  There’s quite a difference between building a liquid cooling system for looks, vs building one that will actually function for years to come.  I will now avoid Thermaltake like the plague, as I’ve found much better parts.  Next machine I build will likely not use liquid cooling at all, because it won’t be as visible, so the aesthetic isn’t critical, and the benefits are fairly minimal.  Enthusiasm is great, because it leads to doing new things.  But, I have to temper my enthusiasm with more research and caution.  I don’t mind paying more, piecing things together, rather than going for the all-in-one kit.

Lessons learned.

Now, back to computing!


Media Marshalling – Why I still archive my DVDs

I’ve gone back and forth on this over the years.  For the most part we’re ‘cord cutters’.  For me it wasn’t about cost, but about changing viewing habits.  We found that of the cable offerings, all we were really using was the connection to sling tv so we could watch Indian serials and movies.  Well, with roku, that’s just a single paid “channel”.  Then came the Amazon Firestick, and all the video content that comes with Prime.  Netflix rounds out the offerings that are most common, and with them creating new content of their own, the likes of HBO and Starz begin to pale into a distant memory.

So, what about DVDs?  Well, most of the time, content available on DVD is available through one of our online subscriptions.  But, not always.  Netflix doesn’t have everything, and in particular, they don’t have some stuff that I would consider to be archival.  Even if they do have something, they may not have it for very long.

I have a strategy around DVD purchasing.  In general I’ll only purchase a DVD if it’s less than $10.  I can justify this as it’s less than the price of a single admission to a movie theatre.  Also, if the DVD is cheaper than the rental price on Amazon, I might buy it.  I’ll buy those compilation DVDs that are like “Oceans 11, 12, 13, and Original”.  That’s 4 movies in all, at least a couple of which I’ve seen a couple of times, and would watch again.  The very first one from the 60s was interesting, because although they “got away with it”, they didn’t end up with anything.  I’ll also purchase DVDs while in India, or on Amazon because they won’t show up necessarily in the US.  Ra-One for example, or the Dhoom movies (although the latest did show up).

I have 118 DVDs now.  I do two things.  1, I archive the .ISO file and store it on the Synology NAS.  Then I use Handbrake to convert to a .mkv file, so that I can serve it up easily using a Plex client on the roku, or firestick, or any client in the home (iPad, phones, guest laptops).  This is great.  But, running a home NAS is an interesting business.  The Synology is pretty good, and the one I have has been in almost constant operation for about 4 years now.  I’ve added one disk, so it has roughly 5 terabytes of storage, with a couple of storage bays open.  At some point within the next 4 years, I’ll be contemplating replacing that thing, at a cost of who knows what.  In the meanwhile, I hope to gosh nothing catastrophic happens to it, because other than being RAID, I don’t have a backup,  or who knows if it suffers a debilitating virus.

Which brings me to a secondary analysis.  I could leverage OneDrive, or some other cloud storage mechanism to archive all this stuff, and just use the home NAS as a local cache.  That would give me the quick access that I want, and the security of a cloud backed up thing to boot.  That would be a great solution for what I travel.  I can still have access to various files, without having to expose my home NAS to the wilds of the internet.  The cost might be about the same as purchasing a new NAS in a few years, so that’s something to look into.

On top of putting my data into an easily accessible place, I can then use it as a dataset to do various experimentations.  What is it about the types of movies that I collect.  Run some cloud based analytics on the images, dialogs, years, actors, etc.  Basically, I could run my own little Netflix scoring engine, and on my own decide what kinds of new movies might be of interest to me.  And then, I wonder if I could sell this information to advertisers, or movie makers?  Something to think about.

And so, I find myself continuing to archive my DVDs.  It’s something I’ve gone into and out of doing over the past 15 years.  Today, they’re so cheap that even though a lot of content can be found through streaming services, it’s worth the convenience to store them and make them available locally.  We’ll see if using the cloud as backup, or as primary storage, makes sense.


Technical Advisor in the office of the CTO

So, I received an email a few weeks back which essentially said “would you consider a role working for the CTO as a Technical Advisor”.  Well, at first, I wasn’t sure what to think, but then I actually talked to who was asking me the question, and I thought, “wait a minute, this could be a really cool thing”.

It’s like this.  At Microsoft, we don’t always have a person in the role of CTO.  Bill Gates was “Chief Scientist” at one point, and Craig Mundie I think had the CTO role, as did Ray Ozzie.  Sometimes it works, sometimes it’s a distraction.

The current CTO is Kevin Scott, and before I actually met him, the #1 comment everyone said about him was “he’s a really cool guy”.  Well, after meeting him, I have the same sentiment.  Kevin’s not an industry luminary from the birth days of the personal computing industry like Ray Ozzie was, he’s an engineer’s engineer with a pedigree that extends through Google, a startup adMob, and LinkedIn, where he continues to be responsible for their backend stuff.

I’ve been at Microsoft for 18 years, which means I’ve done a fair number of things, and I know a fair number of people.  The first aspect of being a TA is getting around, meeting with people, and spreading the word that there’s actually a CTO.

What does the CTO do?  Well, the best description I can give is the CTO acts as the dev manager/architect for the company.  The scope and responsibility of the CTO can be very broad.  Part of it is about efficiency of our joint engineering objectives.  Part of it is making sure we’re marching to the beat of a similar drummer.  Can you imagine, Microsoft has a few multi-billion dollar businesses, led by business managers who are fairly autonomous, and have quite strong independent personalities, or they would not be in the positions they are in.  And along comes the CTO to help unify them.

Really, the job is being fairly impartial where necessary, and just reminding people of their shared goals and objectives, and helping them to reinforce achieving them.

Being a TA to the CTO?  Mostly it’s about going deep in areas.  Kevin Scott is a fast learner, fully capable of digesting tons of info, and fabricating a well informed opinion on his own.  The challenge is one of time.  Microsoft is vast, and if you want to go beyond the surface level in many areas, you’d spend all your time in meetings, and not actually be able to synthesize anything.  So, the TA role.  We have those infinite number of meetings, going deep on multiple topics, synthesizing to a certain level, and surfacing interesting bits to Kevin where decisions and direction might be required.

The the surface description of the role and responsibility.  The truth is, it’s not at all a well defined role.  Eric Rudder was Bill Gate’s TA, for five years, and he was quite a force, doing more than just feeding Bill Gates opinions on what he heard in the company.  We’ll see what our current office of the CTO is capable of, and what kinds of value we are going to impart on the company.

I am excited for this latest opportunity.  I think it’s a fitting role for where I’m at in my career, and what value I can contribute to the company.  So, here we go!


Note to self – subtlety is not an option with Donald Trump

Just yesterday, I wrote Donald Trump is not a dumb guy.  In that missive I was telling myself not to be fooled into the mass hypnosis that Donald Trump is currently performing on the world.  But, alas, someone I actually respect posted a comment questioning my beliefs, and suggesting that I was ok with mass murder.

Well, I am by no means a trump supporter, nor a war monger.  I’m a great many things, but probably none of the things that this person now believes about me.  It’s worth being more direct, so here it is.

Thoughts on Donald Trump.  First of all, it’s probably worth me describing myself in terms of nationality, ethnicity, political and religious leanings.  I am a 52 year old black man born and raised in the United States of America.  I grew up in the very conservative Orange County in California.  Home of John Wayne, and the John Birch society, if you know what that is.  I grew up in a time when my father, who repaired typewriters in schools, had to suffer the indignity of being called a nigger by children in the schools where he worked.  In my home, we were born Christian and while my father was alive, we went to church regularly.

My neighborhood was just a bunch of working class Mexicans and some blacks.  The barrio by any other name.  A place rough enough for the police to only show up in twos if they knew what was good for them.  Migrant workers (“wet backs”), just working people trying to raise their families.

My dad died when I was 7.  At age 10, my mom decided we’d had enough of the Mexican upbringing, and we cast our eyes on a new housing development a couple miles down Orangethorpe.  A new 2 story 4 bedroom house, surrounded by respectable white folks!  Gee, we were moving on up.  So, I went through middle and high school like that, still as Christian as ever, although we didn’t go to church after dad died.  Mom was probably mad and disillusioned with god.  At any rate, I made it through high school, went to Berkeley to study electrical engineering, and eventually started my first company, Adamation.

I did software that was off the beaten path.  Yah, there was this Microsoft thing out there, but these were the days of Mac, NeXT, Taligent, BeOS, and that fledgling Linux thing.

I married a woman I met in college (she was from Goa India), we had a child, we eventually got divorced.  I did not become a hindu during this time, but I was certainly immersed in a lot of hindu ritual and culture.  I’ve read the Bhagavad Gita, and various other Hindu texts.  They seemed quite alright, and offered up a more ancient view of how the world works from a religious perspective.

Roll forward some more years, and I made the move to Microsoft (1998).  The heady days of the birth of XML (which I helped drive for 5 years), and the birth of the CLR and .net frameworks.  And then, 9/11.  I went to work to see panic in the halls.  Colleagues with vague middle-eastern or southeast Asian ancestry or looks, scurrying into my office with reports of their friends being beat up in other parts of the country.  My own fiduciary responsibility driving me to tell close friends that I would have to fire them if they continue to distribute incendiary emails imploring people to route out the terrorists and get rid of them.

Very challenging times.

Roll forward a few more years, 2005, I find myself moving to India to create the Engineering Excellence group in Hyderabad, a relatively new development center for Microsoft.  Somehow, drawn to India again.  This time around, I fall in love with a woman who is muslim.  So, I read for the first time the Quran.  What an eye opener for a Christian such as myself.  Turns out, we (jews, Christians, muslims) are all praying to the same god.  Go figure.  Men have created the dogma around killing each other in the name of this god.  And so, I wanted to marry this woman.  And to do so, I needed to be a muslim man.  Lucky for me, I was already circumcised…

And so, I’m now married to a muslim woman, I consider myself to be a muslim, and we have two beautiful children who are also muslim.

My journey back to the US was less than positive.  My wife had a 10 year visa, but on one of our returns (2009), the border agents at the airport pulled us aside, and into the dreaded interrogation room.  We’re not going to let you into the country until you have a green card, even though you have a valid visitors visa…  Yep, we flew back to India the next morning.  But why?  This is my wife?  “Sorry sir, we don’t know who this alien is, and once she enters the country, she may not leave”.  So, even though we were married, in process of obtaining a green card, and all that, we could not enter the country.

Roll forward to 2016.  Donald Trump, that figure from my past who had always been there, as an entertainer, but never any real significance in my life, is tearing up the Republican party.  They are nothing but deer in the headlights of his red neck hick mobile fueled by bigotry, misogyny, racism, and all the other things that tear apart civil society.  He is tearing back the curtain of political correctness, and essentially relieving the pressure that a set of Americans feel has kept them bottled up far too long.  They made, and they’re somewhat active.  His opponent, an ineffective democrat who did not have the pulse of the people in the way that President Obama did before her.  All excuses aside, I’m not sure having Hillary in office would have been that effective with a house and senate controlled by republicans.  But, I digress.

Donald trump using a series of tactics that are so obvious from an outside observers perspective that I’m always surprised (becoming less so) that they work.  Like Penn and Teller (magicians), he tells you exactly how he’s deceiving you, how he’s using misdirection, how he’s manipulating your emotions, appearing to join your perspective, and then he pulls the wool over your eyes and you still can’t believe how he’s pulled that off.  It’s just sickening.

His first few months in office have been typical for someone full of bluster, but little political experience.  First he shocks the world by essentially saying “all bets are off.  You can throw out all your past assumptions, there’s a new sheriff in town”.  That’s a tactic.  Now everyone is on pause.  Is he as racist, isolationist, bigoted, misogynistic as his bluster portrays, or is he simply the best Democrat that could be elected at this time to deal with the Republic controlled house and senate.

And so, he bombs Syria.  Now, it strikes me as a lifelong pacifist that bombing people is nothing to be proud of.  Every time a building of “collateral damage” is destroyed, every time a truck plows into a crowd of people, every time a government chooses to gas its own, every time we shoot a petty dictactor in a hidey hole, my heart sinks.  We should never be proud of our ability to hunt down and destroy human beings.  It’s sad that we have people we believe horrible enough to have this done to them, and it’s sad that we’re horrible enough people to do this.

For ever cop that kills a black man, I’m scared for my safety.  For every muslim identified terrorist that pulls off an atrocity, I’m scared for the safety of myself, and my family.  For every executive order issued by my own government, I afraid I will be rounded up and placed in an internment camp or worse.

I live in a world now where I have a contingency plan for rapidly departing my own country as soon as the “muslim registry” rears its ugly head.  Fleeing the country may be no solice, nor refuge though.  Our next best stop is India, and they have a tolerance, but not love for muslims.  Anywhere else is a dice role with an American passport, and a family with mixed heritage.

And so, to rephrase my previous post on the subject.  Donald Trump is not dumb.  He just blew up a Syrian air base in response to the Syrian government using chemical weapons on its own people.  Using chemical weapons is an international crime easily deplored by all countries.  The Syrian government should be held accountable for this action.

Donald Trump has gained enough political saavy to exploit this situation to his own gains.  I doubt he cares much about the loss of life in Syria, but he does care about getting China to deal with North Korea.  He will  use his bombing of the Syrian air base to show that he’s got big guns and is not afraid to use them.  He will say this in plain word’s to China’s president, as he has him sitting in his own private resort, sitting on his own patio, drinking from his own wine glasses.  This is big dog diplomacy 101.

So, in short, to my colleagues who might question where I stand on subjects of Donald Trump, muslims, war, and the like.  I would rather go to jail than go to war (never registered for the draft, got three threating letters from the government on the same).  And for those who think I’m a hypocrite for such a stance, I guess I’m the worst kind of conservative.  I will defend my family til the death, but for a country that would just as easily shoot me at a traffic stop, or stick me in an internment camp, or call me nigger and equate me to the lowest of animals, I say “fuck you”, I’m surviving as best I can, and I’m going to do right by mine, to survive and thrive, and raise my kids to build a better society that doesn’t suffer from all this nonsense.

 


Note to self – President Trump is not a dumb guy

I have to make a note to myself as a way to mark various events that are occurring, while I can still remember.  A little time capsule if you will.

I did not vote for Mr Trump in the 2016 election, but I am certainly an observer of human behavior. I recently read an interview with Scott Adams in which he explained his views and observations of trump as essentially a mass hypnotist.  I tend to agree with this view.  That and the fact that Mr Trump is decently good at quite a few things, but probably not a master of anything.  His combined skills on those several things have kept him in an elevated position his entire life.

But, what do I observe today, Friday April 7 2017?  A couple weeks back, North Korea doing saber rattling as usual.  US and Japan doing military exercises near them.  Syrian government allegedly using chemical weapons on their own people, and the Chinese president Xi Jinping doing a world tour, stopping by the US colony to check on things.

So, what happens?  The US drops a bunch of munitions (roughly 50 tomahawk cruise missiles) on a Syrian airbase that was supposedly a part of the use of the chemical weapons.  And, the next day, president Xi comes to visit…

Now, while the various pundits are wondering what this little show of aggression leads to in terms of the US involvement in Syria, I tend to think it has nothing to do with Syria at all.  It’s a calculated way for Mr Trump to show his lack of fear, and ability to act unilaterally.  He probably could not care less about Syria.  What he does care about is showing China that he’s not afraid to go after North Korea.  He’s trying to show the rest of the world that although his rhetoric is America first protectionist, it is in fact “American interests first”, which is subtly different, and means everything in the world.  Mr Trump is telling the world, he will use American military to advance and protect American interests around the world.

This gives teeth to the “China better do something about North Korea, or I will”.  Mr trump is going after the Vladimir Putin “strong man” leadership style.  He doesn’t care about his popularity, as he knows there’s nothing like a little world skirmishing in the name of American interests to boost that.  He’s playing the world, and the world is probably a step or two behind.  This will be interesting to see the interaction with China, because although Mr Trump might be playing the world, China plans 50 – 100 years ahead.

Grab your popcorn.


RIP Tiko?

Kickstarter is a great adventure in the democratization of business finance.  Not everything on Kickstarter succeeds, to say the least.  I’ve backed a couple of projects over the years, and actually received my rewards.  There’s one project I was watching over the last year, that I did not invest in, the Tiko 3D printer.

ti3

It was fun watching this story unfold.  They ended up being a year late with their delivery, went through many trials and tribulations, and essentially failed to deliver in the end.

Looking at this picture now, in retrospect, we can assume that it was a complete fabrication.  Having printed such an engine block on my very commercially available printer, I know that they could not have possibly generated those pieces given the state their printer was in.  Without a cooling fan, they would not have been able to generate the intricate detail, and with their components overheating, they would not have lasted through a print.

But, that’s retrospective.  When you’re watching the train wreck happening, you’re rooting for them, giving them the benefit, and hoping they’re actually doing as well as their arrogance would lead you to believe.
For those few thousand who received their units, I’m betting it will turn out to be their MakerBot Cupcake.  A first printer, not many good prints out of it, then they’ll move on to a real printer, and this becomes salvage in a couple of years.

The saving grace is it was only around $200, so from that perspective, anyone who backed the project was only out a fairly small investment.  That amount of money is probably easily spent on getting coffee every morning for half a year.

They did show that you can come out with stylish looking things.  I’m sure someone else will attempt something similar, having benefitted from Tiko’s mistakes.  They’ll come up with a better solution for cooling the internals, they’ll add a door, they’ll put the filament outside the box, they’ll make it bigger, they’ll add a parts cooling fan, and it will come from AliExpress still for $200.  It will support Simplify3D, Cura, and Slic3r instead of their custom slicer, and the world will move on.

Tiko as a company has not thrown in the towel and said “we’re out of business”, but they have essentially put everything on hold as they’ve run out of money.

And so it goes.

Another project I’ve been following is the GlowForge 3D laser “printer”.  That machine is similarly way overdue, and they have a similar vibe of secrecy about them.  This time I am holding out hope that they do in fact deliver.  You can actually cancel your order up to the last moment before it’s delivered, but again, while you’re watching the train wreck, you’re hopeful that they’ll pull it out in the end and everything will be alright.

So, come on GlowForge!  I’m rooting for you.

It’s kind of like watching the Truman Show.

 


Decommissioning Makerbot Cupcake

This was the first 3D printer I ever had

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This picture shows the machine after its last Frankenstein operation circa 2011.  I purchased it as a kit in the first place so that I could ultimately create some simple objects like this: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:11255 to connect drinking straws so that my daughter and I could construct objects like geodesic domes.

Well, this machine never printed more than one or two objects in it wacky storied life until it was replaced with the original Up! machine, which just worked out of the box.

Those were heady days in the 3D printing industry.  RepRap, and the notion of printers printing parts for themselves was still an ideal, and the likes of Ultimaker, Zortrax, and even Prusa, were just glimmers in their creators eyes.

The hotend for this thing (that mass of acrylic and steel sitting on the 5″x5″ platform in the middle there, probably weighed nearly a pound, consumed 3mm plastic, and just didn’t really work.

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All those nuts and bolts, tons of acrylic, funky resistors, an even a piece of delrin.  It was all well intentioned, and all very experiemental, and it all just didn’t quite work for me.  Compared to a new modern extruder/hotend combo, this might seem relatively stone age, but it did have all the basics that we take for granite today.

I’m happy we built this machine.  It was a great bonding experience, and it was then that my daughter and I cemented ourselves as ‘makers’.  We went to a MakerFaire, played with electronics, sewed leds into a dress, and generally carried ourselves into the modern age of making.

I have since purchased an original Up!, an early prusa mendel, original ultimaker.  Then I jumped into another realm with a ZCorp 650, ZCorp 660, then back down to earth with an Afinia Up Box, and lately Type A Machines Hub, and Prusa i3 MK2.  That’s a lot of plastic, powder, glue and frustration right there in all that madness.

I purchased the first kit to make a little something for me and the daughter to play with.  I’ve since explored the various ways in which these devices may or may not be utilized in the real of custom on-demand manufacturing.  That journey continues.

This cupcake was both fun and frustrating as all heck.  I’m a bit nostalgic to see it go, but now that it’s real value is in the various M3 screws and nuts, I’m happy to have let this particular nightmare in our printing history go.

RIP cupcake.  You served us well.