Note To Self – VS Code seems reasonable

No secret, I still work for Microsoft…

Over the past 17 years of working for the company, my go-to editor had largely been Visual Studio.  Since about 2000, it was Visual C#.  Then around 2011, I switched up, and started doing a lot of Javascript, Lua, and other languages, and my editor went from Notepad++, to a combination of Sublime Text and vim.

Most recently, I’ve had the opportunity to try and enable some editing on Windows 10 tablets, and I chose a new editor, Visual Studio Code.  I am by no means a corporate apologist, but I will certainly point out when I think my company is doing something good.  Visual Studio Code is an easy replacement for Sublime Text, at least for my needs and tastes.  I’ve been trying it out on and off for the past few months, and it just keeps improving.

Like all modern editors, it has an ‘add-on’ capability, which has a huge community of add-on builders adding on stuff.  Of course, there’s some lua syntax highlighting, which makes it A number one in my book already.  But, there are other built in features that I like as well.  It has a simple and sane integration with git repositories right out of the box.  So, I just open up my favorite projects, start editing, and it shows which files are out of sync.  A couple of clicks, type in my credentials, and the sync/push happens.  I’m sure there’s an extension for that in all modern editors, including Sublime Text, but here it’s just built into the base editor.

One item that struck me as a pleasant surprise the other day was built in support for markdown language.  I was refreshing the documentation files for schedlua, and I was putting in code block indicators (“`lua).  After I put in one such indicator, I noticed the quoted code suddenly had the lua syntax highlighting!  Yah, well, ok, getting excited about not much.  But, I had never seen that with Sublime Text, so it was new for me.  That was one of those features that just made me go ‘sold’.

The editor has other features such as being able to run a command line from within the editor and such, but it’s not a full blown IDE like Visual Studio, which is good because the tablets I’m running it on don’t have 4 – 8Gb of RAM to run Visual Studio comfortably.  So, it’s just enough editor to replace the likes of Sublime Text.  I also like the fact that it’s backed by a large company that is dedicated to continue to improve it over time with regular updates.  The community that’s being built up around add-ons seems fairly robust, which is also another good sign.  Given Microsoft’s current penchant for Open Sourcing things, I would not be surprised if it showed up available on GitHub some day in the future, which would just make it that much more interesting.

So, for now (future self), I will be using VS Code as my editor on Windows, MacOS, and Linux.  It has the stability and feature set that I need, and it continues to evolve, adding more stability and features that I find to be useful.

 

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